Finite-State Complexity and the Size of Transducers

Cristian Calude
(University of Auckland)
Kai Salomaa
(Queen's University)
Tania Roblot
(University of Auckland)

Finite-state complexity is a variant of algorithmic information theory obtained by replacing Turing machines with finite transducers. We consider the state-size of transducers needed for minimal descriptions of arbitrary strings and, as our main result, we show that the state-size hierarchy with respect to a standard encoding is infinite. We consider also hierarchies yielded by more general computable encodings.

In Ian McQuillan and Giovanni Pighizzini: Proceedings Twelfth Annual Workshop on Descriptional Complexity of Formal Systems (DCFS 2010), Saskatoon, Canada, 8-10th August 2010, Electronic Proceedings in Theoretical Computer Science 31, pp. 38–47.
Published: 7th August 2010.

ArXived at: http://dx.doi.org/10.4204/EPTCS.31.6 bibtex PDF

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